Hot Buttered Rum and Family

Parish Group Presents a special NYE Run with

Hot Buttered Rum and Family

The Brothers Comatose, special guest Zac Matthews

Sun, December 30, 2012

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Brick & Mortar Music Hall

San Francisco, CA

$20.00 - $67.50

This event is 18 and over

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Hot Buttered Rum and Family
Hot Buttered Rum and Family
Initially formed as an acoustic string band, seven years of constant touring has transformed Hot Buttered Rum into a plugged-in, percussive powerhouse that wows critics and fans alike. Their left-coast rock reveals an access to jazz, country, and world music that few groups can match. While the band's music belies simple categorization, its songwriting and stage chemistry delights listeners at every turn.

Hot Buttered Rum's story is one of evolution. The "high altitude bluegrass" era captured on their first studio album, In These Parts, found the band enjoying success at such diverse stages as the Newport Folk Festival, Bonnaroo, Grey Fox, High Sierra, Wakarusa, and the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. Along the way, the group shared the stage with some of today's most accomplished artists, including Phil Lesh, Bela Fleck, Ben Harper, and Nickel Creek's Chris Thile. In 2006, acoustic pioneer Mike Marshall produced Hot Buttered Rum's second studio album, Well-Oiled Machine, and captured the sound of a hard-touring band charting its course along the highways and byways of American music.

The continued expansion of Hot Buttered Rum's sound and writing found a home in Live in the Northeast. More electric pickups made their way to the stage, along with an increased focus on songwriting. As the band developed a heavier sound, fans and press began to describe them as a rock band with acoustic instruments. It therefore came as no surprise when, following the departure of mandolinist Zac Matthews, the other founding members Aaron Redner (fiddle and mandolin), Bryan Horne (upright bass), Nat Keefe (guitar), and Erik Yates (banjo, guitar, woodwinds, and resophonic guitar) joined forces with Everyone Orchestra conductor and drummer Matt Butler.

The new lineup has recently emerged from San Francisco's Mission Bells Studios, where they recorded Limbs Akimbo under the watchful eye of producer Tim Bluhm (The Mother Hips). Featuring guest appearances by Jackie Greene (Skinny Singers, Phil Lesh and Friends) and Zach Gill (ALO, Jack Johnson), the album marks the beginning of a new creative phase. Limbs Akimbo now signals the arrival of a highly matured, impressively listenable, stirringly rocking, and pleasantly poppy sound. Proving himself a forceful producer, Bluhm has struck an impressive balance between highlighting the multi-instrumental, cross-genre elements of the band's sound while avoiding the contemporary trappings of music that is complex and different merely for the sake of complexity and difference. The result is beautifully paradoxical: a tremendous, minimalist pop album full of hints, teases, and cameos of the band's complex musical personality. In "Something New," Keefe recites the familiar wedding adage "something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue." And right there, in a nutshell, is Limbs Akimbo: an album that is both an elegy and reincarnation of Hot Buttered Rum's past sound, that borrows heavily from the rock pantheon while sprinkling in just a little of everything else. Limbs Akimbo is an album that evidences the acoustic string band of yesteryear while unapologetically propelling into the scene a mature left-coast, drum-driven, pop-rock band.
The Brothers Comatose
The Brothers Comatose
"The good thing about a string band, is that things tend to culminate with dancing rather than elbows flying in a mosh-pit," says Gio Benedetti of the Brothers Comatose. The original members of the quintet with brothers Alex and Ben Morrison, bonded at the Morrison family acoustic music parties before taking a youthful foray into punk and rock bands *and ultimately* before circling back to the music they learned in that living room. They credit both beginnings for the attitude of their current music. and As a testament to their skillful energy; they have already played the major festivals including the esteemed Hardly Strictly Bluegrass Festival, The Strawberry Festival and High Sierra.

On the new album, Respect The Van out May 22, their music is not a wavering mélange of assorted styles, but decided and strong bluegrass-influenced folk rock. With the addition of members Philip Brezina (fiddle) and Ryan Avellone (mandolin) the band aims "to offer a damn good time, with a no-bullshit style that we found in those original living room parties and our live shows," says Ben. "We tracked everything for the album live in one big room – treating the studio like a stage," he explains.

As for the name, only a brother could pick it out by observing his sibling. Guitarist *and vocalist* Ben said when brother Alex Morrison *(banjo and vocals) * goes into a trance-like state while playing his banjo, "his eyes roll back in his head like he's in a coma." It's certainly not indicative of their music, which doesn't have any of the indulgent noodling breaks characterized by other string based bands – though the musicianship is solidly there, it's given with a communal and inclusive spirit to sing and dance along to. Now, at live shows, the San Francisco band is known for handing out chopsticks to the audience for participatory percussion on whatever surface is closest.

And while the music is strong and clear, there are some serious themes as in the lead track "Modern Day Sinners," a Guthrie inspired populist sing-along with shades of 50's R&B and doo-wop in the harmonies and feel. "I wanted to call 'bullshit' of the type of politician or fat radio host that's giving advice while living a terrible and shameful life," says *bassist and* vocalist and banjoist Gio.

"Scout" was written by Ben as part of "The 52 week club," a songwriting group that sends out theme a week as a writing prompt. "It my first contribution. I wrote it from an autobiographical perspective of a young boy scout hanging out with his grandpa," shares Ben. "My grandpa was a nice man some of the time, but could also just be bitter and I always wondered what he was so angry about. This song is about the young scout hanging onto his youth and and hoping to keep that spirit at the end."

120 East" is a harmonic ode to the brotherhood of a band, written about The Brothers Comatose's journey to and from The Strawberry Music Festival. "I wanted to capture the sense of being with your best friends, of being willing to trust them and follow them anywhere," says Gio.

The band wrote a raucous, fiddle tune ode to their 1988 Chevy G20 tour van and called it, fittingly, "The Van Song." "Phil wrote all the instrumental melodies and it didn't have any official lyrics for a long time," says Gio. "It saw two rowdy live performances where we all just made up verses on the spot. We finally wrote some real lyrics, and had to record it - we love our van in a way that is border-line obsessive."

"Morning Time" is Ben's folk-country duet with breakout artist Nicki Bluhm. "It tells of the ever present struggles between man and woman – the guy wants to maintain his life in the big city with all of its late nights, bustle and craziness and the woman is ready for a mellower life. It's a compromise and ultimately setting aside some quality time in the morning to spend together," shares Ben

"Feels Like The Devil" is a drop-tuned, resonator-driven shit-kicker that would be at home on any bluegrass stage, while "Pennies are Money Too" is an old-timey instrumental that well illustrates the band's musicianship.

Despite their name, the band is anything but Comatose. "It's just one, big, extended Morrison music party," they say. The Brothers Comatose will be playing all spring and summer including April dates in Boise, Portland, Eugene, Washington State, North Carolina and all thru California, including appearances at the Banjo-B-Cue festival, and the Kate Wolf Festival. More dates and new videos will be announced soon.
special guest Zac Matthews
**All patrons under 21 years old must purchase a $5 drink ticket.
Venue Information:
Brick & Mortar Music Hall
1710 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA, 94103
http://www.brickandmortarmusic.com/